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Vitamin Chart

Type Benefits Sources
Vitamin A growth
night vision
membranes
epithelial tissues and glands
prevents infection
functions of nervous tissue
controls action of bone cells
normal fertility
glucose synthesis
Amaranth Leaves
Apricots
Bok Choy
Broccoli
Brussels Sprouts
Butternut Squash
Cantaloupe
Carrots
Chestnuts
Chinese Broccoli
Chinese Cabbage
Eggs
Kale
Leeks
Mangos
Milk
Papayas
Peaches
Peas
Pecans
Pistachios
Pumpkin
Rapini
Spinach
Squash - summer
Squash - winter
Sweet Potato
Swiss Chard
B1 or Thiamin helps the body convert carbohydrates into energy and is necessary for the heart, muscles, and nervous system to function properly.
Asparagus
Avocado
Beef
Boysenberries
Brazil Nuts
Breadfruit
Brussels Sprouts
Buckwheat
Butternut Squash
Cashews
Catfish
Cherimoya
Chestnuts
Corn
Dates
Filberts/Hazelnuts
Flax Seed
French Beans
Grapes
Grapefruit
Guava
Herring
Lima Beans
Loganberries
Lowfat Yogurt
Macadamia Nuts
Mango
Milk
Millet
Nuts/Pignolias
Oats
Okra
Orange
Parsnips
Peanuts
Peas
Pecans
Pine
Pineapple
Pistachios
Pomegranate
Pork
Quinoa
Rice Brown
Rye
Salmon
Soy Beans
Soy Milk
Sweet Potato
Tuna
Watermelon
B2 or Riboflavin essential for turning carbohydrates into energy and producing red blood cells also important for vision. meat, eggs, legumes (like peas and lentils), nuts, dairy products, green leafy vegetables, broccoli, asparagus, and fortified cereals.
B3 or Niacin helps the body turn food into energy. It helps maintain healthy skin and is important for nerve function. red meat, poultry, fish, fortified hot and cold cereals, and peanuts.
B5 or Pantothenic Acid required to sustain life avocados, beef, broccoli, brussels sprouts
corn, hamburger, okra, poultry, pumpkin, salmon, sardines, spaghetti squash, sweet potato, tuna
Vitamin B6 important for normal brain and nerve function. It also helps the body break down proteins and make red blood cells potatoes, bananas, beans, seeds, nuts, red meat, poultry, fish, eggs, spinach, and fortified cereals.
B7 (Biotin) cell growth, the production of fatty acids, and the metabolism of fats and amino acids. cauliflower, bananas and mushrooms, produced internally in the gut via bacteria
B9, Folate (also known as folic acid) helps the body make red blood cells and also needed to make DNA. Liver, dried beans and other legumes, green leafy vegetables, asparagus, and orange juice are good sources of this vitamin. So are fortified bread, rice, and cereals.
Vitamin B12 helps to make red blood cells, and is important for nerve cell function. fish, red meat, poultry, milk, cheese, and eggs
Vitamin C functions such as the synthesis of collagen, carnitine, and neurotransmitters, the synthesis and catabolism of tyrosine, and the metabolism of microsome. It's important for healthy bones, teeth, gums, and blood vessels. red berries, kiwi, red and green bell peppers, tomatoes, broccoli, spinach
Vitamin D strengthens bones egg yolks, fish oils, and fortified foods like milk. biggest source of D is sunlight
Vitamin E primary defenders against the adverse effects of free radicals polyunsaturated plant oils, leafy green vegetables, wheat germ, whole grains, liver, egg yolks, nuts, seeds, fatty meats
Vitamin K blood clotting green vegetables such as collards, spinach, bib lettuce, brussel sprouts, and cabbage. also vegetable oils such as soybean oil and canola oil